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Woman Fined $500 For Bringing An Apple From a Delta Flight

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Traveling to other countries can be a big expense between flights, hotels, and activities. One woman ended having to pay more than she ever bargained for, however, when she was fined $500 by U.S. Customs and Border Patrol after she brought an apple from an international flight onboard her domestic flight. Now she is blaming the airline.

Crystal Tadlock was traveling from her vacation in Paris back home to Colorado on a Delta flight. Tadlock said before they landed back in the states, flight attendants on her Delta flight began handing out pre-bagged apples.

According to Fox News, Tadlock wasn’t hungry at the time and decided to put her apple in her carry-on bag for the next leg of the flight. When she arrived at customs, her bag was randomly checked.

During the search, a customs agent pulled out the apple with the Delta logo on it. “He had asked me if my trip to France was expensive. And I said yeah… I didn’t really get why he was asking that question. And then he said it’s about to get a lot more expensive after I charge you $500,” Tadlock recalled the customs agent telling her.

Understandably, Tadlock was in shock that she had just been fined an exorbitant amount for bringing undeclared fruit into the country. And she was understandably upset that the airline she had flown on had unintentionally caused the problem.

“I understand the laws and the department of agriculture doesn’t want certain insects in the US. But once again, the apple is from Delta and I think that’s the most important part of this story,” Tadlock said.

The fine was a concern, but it was not the main concern. Since this charge will now be added to her profile, she could run the risk of losing her Global Entry Status.

Tadlock plans to fight the fine as the fruit was provided by the airline. She may be fighting an uphill battle, though. A spokesperson from U.S. Customs and Border Protection told WRAL: “Privacy policy prohibits us from discussing the details of any individual’s specific inspection; however, all agriculture items must be declared.”

“The violation is for one apple,” she said. “It’s really unfortunate someone has to go through that and be treated like a criminal over a piece of fruit.”