News

Twitch Sues Users Who Spammed Porn and Gore on Popular Streamed Game

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr

The internet is full of trolls who love to get a rise out of individuals online without having to worry about the risk of repercussion. These trolls’ attempts, for the most part, are tame and many are just kids acting out, but it can quickly turn much more sinister as the streaming service Twitch.tv found out firsthand.

Twitch has announced it is suing malicious users who plagued the Artifact page with violence, pornography, copyrighted content and the live streamed footage of the March 2019 Christchurch mosque attack.

Artifact is a card collecting game that follows the lore of Dota 2, a popular game streamed on the site. Artifact only has a hundred to two hundred users playing the game at a time, which is rather low compared to other games on the site.

This could have been why the culprit chose this particular game as his illegal activity would not have been discovered as quickly by Twitch users or moderators.

Ironically, the streaming platform doesn’t know who is responsible for the content. According to Polygon, the lawsuit was launched on June 14th with the defendant being named “John and Jane Does 1 through 100.”

The lawsuit is based on the user or users breaking Twitch’s terms of services, trademark infringement and fraud. “Twitch’s success is due in part to the measures it has taken to create a safe and accessible community for its millions of users,” the lawsuit stated. “Twitch does not tolerate harassing or dangerous content, nudity and sexually explicit content or activities, or physical violence (including gore).”

Twitch claimed in their lawsuit that they tried to take the offensive content down, but it was being uploaded faster than their staff could delete it, which resulted in the site not allowing new users to stream.

Twitch said that every time they would ban an account, a newly created account would upload the same content the moderators had just deleted.

“Twitch took down the posts and banned the offending accounts, but the offensive video streams quickly reappeared using new accounts,” the complaint continues. “It appears that Defendants use automated methods to create accounts and disseminate offensive material as well as to thwart Twitch’s safety mechanisms.”

It’s unclear how Twitch plans to determine the defendant’s name or location. The moderators of the site eventually got the matter under control.