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Trump announces Scott Pruitt’s Resignation as Head of EPA

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Scott Pruitt’s tenure with the Trump administration has officially come to an end. The scandal plagued EPA Administrator resigned Thursday.  Pruitt has been dogged with numerous allegations of political graft, from trying to secure a Chick-fil-A franchise for his wife, to allegations that he required his staffers to personally pay for his hotel rooms.

The President’s support for Pruitt had remained strong, and his announcement today kept with that tone. Despite the long list of investigations and allegations, Pruitt himself seemed assured of his performance.

“But in an unexpected culmination to a one of the most remarkable accumulations of scandal in Washington lore, the disgraced cabinet official attributed his joining the Trump administration to divine providence,” The Daily Mail notes.

“I believe you are serving as President today because of God’s providence. I believe that same providence brought me into your service,” Pruitt wrote Trump in his resignation letter.

That belief stands in stark contrast to the public perception. The most recent allegations concerned Pruitt’s desire to be the Attorney General. He reportedly asked for Jeff Sessions to be removed from the office so he might step in.

President Trump announced the news in a Tweet.

“Scott Pruitt did an outstanding job inside of the EPA. We’ve gotten rid of record breaking regulations and it’s been really good,” the president later told reporters. “You know, obviously the controversies with Scott, but within the agency we were extremely happy.”

Considering the turnover in Trump’s cabinet to date, this list seems exceptionally long. The Daily Mail put together a list of the controversies:

  • Paid just $50 a night to stay in a condo owned by an energy lobbyist’s wife but only when he was in town (and called it ‘market rent’);
  • Had his door battered down by Capitol Hill Police because he wasn’t responding and claimed he was ‘napping’ – on a weekday afternoon;
  • Allegedly demanded flashing lights and sirens to get through traffic because he was late for dinner;
  • Also allegedly demanded a bulletproof SUV with run-flat tires  – and a bulletproof desk;
  • Got a desk ‘bigger than the Resolute’ and a soundproof phone booth to stop officials hearing his calls;
  • Had his security chief reassigned, allegedly for questioning his demands;
  • Allegedly had other officials moved or reassigned for questioning his spending;
  • Claimed to know nothing about pay raises given to two key aides he brought with him from Oklahoma; when the
  • White House turned them down, officials found a loophole;
  • Booked private jet flights and got authorization afterwards when it was too late to turn them down;
  • Used flights through hubs so he could then get home to Oklahoma more cheaply from there;
  • Got first class flights, with officials claiming he had ‘threats’ and needed to be kept from ordinary passengers – but only
  • concrete example was someone shouting ‘you’re f***ing up the environment’ in Atlanta Airport;
  • Officials looked into getting him $100,000 a month private jet from NetJets;
  • His spokesman falsely claimed he had a ‘blanket waiver’ to fly in first;
  • Missed a flight en route to Morocco and spent a day and a night in Paris instead;
  • Took his round the clock security detail on his vacation to the Greek islands and Turkey;
  • When he was questioned about his $50-a-night deal by Fox News said it was ‘unfair to ask.’
  • Used an aide to help him shop for a used luxury mattress at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C.
  • Used 24/7 security detail to pick up dry cleaning and help him shop for lotion
  • Had aides keep ‘bad’ information off his official schedule
  • Asked a top aide to help get his wife a $200,000 job
  • Sought to use contacts to get his wife a Chick-fil-A franchise
  • Asked an aide to get him a used mattress at a Trump hotel in Washington
  • Spoke to Trump about becoming attorney general in midst of Russia probe

Where Pruitt will go now, politically, seems much less certain.