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This $150,000 Quad Copter Hoverbike is Everything You Want. [VIDEO]

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The Hoverbike is hardly a new concept. In many ways, it appears to be the logical downsizing of a helicopter. Or maybe you see it as a man-sized drone that can be piloted with on-board controls. Either way, the Hoverbike is turning heads and looks to revolutionize the way we think about personal transportation.

A Russian company, Hoversurf, is producing the Hoverbike. Their taking orders now for their $150,000 quad-cycle-copter-thing. The price has put the Hoverbike within reach for many, including the Dubai Police.

The Hovebike has many people wondering about safety. The exposed blades are positioned just below the Hoverbike operator. Any sudden stop could end in catastrophe. Yet the company promises that safety mechanisms on board will stop the blades if the pilot, for some reason, comes unsaddled.

“It will fly 16 feet (5m) above the ground, reaching a top speed of 60mph (96 km) – although this will be limited to the legal speed in each country,” Daily Mail writes.

Current flight times car reach 25 minutes. The Hoverbike  can also be controlled remotely, and will fly for 40 minutes without the weight of a pilot.

“The dimensions of the Hoverbike allow it to be rolled in a standard doorway while also having ability to take-off and land from an ordinary parking space,” the company says.

“The weight of the hoverbike is 114 kg (253 pounds) limited by law, but by reducing the weight of the frame it allowed us to install a more capacious battery.”

“Our safe flight altitude is 5 meters above the ground (16 feet), but the pilot himself can adjust the limit to their comfortability.”

The most intriguing news is that the Hoverbike  has cleared Federal Aviation Administration requirements and is now classified as an ultralight vehicle. This means you won’t need a pilot’s license to operate one, and you may not need a drone license either.

Could this be the future of transportation, or is the Hoverbike just a proof-of-concept?