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Marvel Founder Stan Lee Dead at 95

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Stan Lee, creator of Spider-Man and numerous other comic book icons, is dead at 95. Lee has had increasingly challenging health issues, including recent bouts with pneumonia. He was taken to Cedars-Sinai medical Center on Monday, but died shortly thereafter. Now, a nation of devoted Stan Lee fans, are mourning the loss of a genuine creative genius.

“My father loved all of his fans. He was the greatest, most decent man,” J.C. Lee, his daughter, told reporters.

Lee is credited with many of the most beloved comic characters: Spider-Man, Black Panther, The Avengers, and the X-Men. He founded Marvel Comics with Jack Kirby in 1961.The company is a publishing powerhouse, and also a massive film studio. Lee has, since its inception, been an champion of the brand–at least until the end when internal politics resulted in a schism.

The relationship between Lee and Marvel had grown contentious in his final months however, and in May he filed a billion-dollar lawsuit against the company.

“[A] complaint, filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, alleged that POW! Entertainment CEO Shane Duffy and co-founder Gill Champion failed to fully disclose to Lee details of the firm’s 2017 sale to Camsing International,” Daily Mail writes.

“Lee said that the company took advantage of him at a time when he was despondent over the death of his wife Joan and suffering from macular degeneration, a condition affecting the eyes.”

“As a result, he was duped into signing an agreement giving away the rights to his image and likeness states the complaint.”

Part of Lee’s genius is that his characters all have deep flaws. In an attempt to make his comic books more relatable, he moved away from the super-human personas that dominated some of the earlier books of the genre. He replaced them with common people with real problems, then gave them incredible powers. Audiences loved the idea.

Lee’s wife Joan died at age 93 in 2017. The couple had been married for 70 years.