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Cops Seize 553 Firearms From a Single Gun Owner

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The debate over firearms continues unabated. Advocates of tighter restrictions want new laws to, as they see it, help end the epidemic of gun violence. Proponents of the Second Amendment point to lax enforcement of existing laws. Now one of those laws has been enforced, and hundreds of firearms have been seized from one felon.

The news comes from California, the state with some of the most stringent firearms laws in the nation.

“Authorities have seized more than 550 guns at two Southern California homes and made one arrest after getting a tip that a convicted felon was storing an arsenal,” Fox writes.

“Sixty-year-old Manuel Fernandez was arrested last week after Los Angeles County sheriff’s deputies and state and federal investigators raided his Agua Dulce home.”

The authorities found 432 rifles and handguns on their first attempt. They went back and found 91 other guns, hidden.

That wasn’t the end, though. They went to another residence and found 30 more. Those belonged to “an associate of Fernandez.” Police are still looking for that person. She wasn’t at home when the raid occurred, and has yet to come back to the residence.

“Detectives also seized computers, cellphones, and hard drives from the residence believed to be involved in the illicit purchase of firearms by the suspect,” the sheriff’s department noted.

Fernandez arrested “on suspicion of being a felon in possession of firearms and ammunition and illegally possessing an assault rifle and large-capacity magazines,” Fox writes. That seems a bit like an understatement.

While both sides of the firearms debate could agree on the merit of the arrest, there is another bit of the story. Fernandez, the man arrested with all of the weapons, is out on bond.

“The case is a testament to the community’s involvement in reducing crime and taking guns out of the hands of criminals,” Sheriff Jim McDonnell said.

The Los Angeles Times suggest the man was a collector and had no malicious intentions for his “collection.”