Amazing Story of Russian Self Surgery

28E7267800000578-3093137-image-a-3_1432542439148(Russian Self Surgery)

28E7267800000578-3093137-image-a-3_1432542439148(Russian Self Surgery)

The Antarctic is one of the most inhospitable places on earth, and anyone unfortunate enough to be there is entirely dependent on the outside to supply aid, which withering snow storms can block out at any time. So what do you do if you have an emergency, like an appendix threatening to burst? Well , if your Dr. Rogzov, you personal remove it yourself.  After thirty days of hiding symptoms, the Russian doctor gathered a group of assistants and created an impromptu surgeon’s table.

The doctor was only able to take a single dose of local anesthetic before operating, and forty minutes later, he began to suffer vertigo and take breaks every four minutes. Working with a single lamp, a mirror, and he’s familiarity with the human body, Dr. Rogzov began searching for his ‘malignant organ’ Upon removing his appendix, and seeing a dark spot on its bottom, a sign it was about to burst, the good doctor Rogzov says ”  my heart seized up and noticeable slowed; my hands felt like rubber.”

Within a few weeks, after removing his own stitches, Dr. Rogsov was able to preform his normal base duties. Two years later, he returned to Leningrad and taught at the Department of General Surgery of the First Leningrad Medical Institute, working there for the rest of his life. When asked about accolades regarding this wonder of self surgery, Dr. Rogsov is quoted as saying it was “a job like any other, a life like any other”.

The specifics of this amazing act can be found in a British Medical Journal report that his son Vladislav wrote. The report includes details of the surgery, including a strange gurgling noise that apparently cleared the room. Information from Rogzov’s journal gives further insight, with Rogzov’s main concern was for his team and how disturbed they were by the act.

To read more about this amazing Russian, read the full British Medical Journal report