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German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s political reputation was forever tarnished when she championed an inclusive immigration policy that brought thousands of Syrian refugees into Germany.

And now she’s officially reversed her position. The Chancellor has revisited her position and has called for a “national push” to deport as many of the problematic asylum seeker as possible from her country.

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The effort isn’t going to be easy. Germany has had little success in the past with removing migrants, and that was before their numbers increased so dramatically. Nearly a million refugees have crossed into Germany in the last two years alone. The influx has created a deportation backlog that the German government is struggling to overcome.

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“We need a national push to deport those who are rejected,” Merkel tolr reporters Saturday. “That’s indisputable and we’re working hard on that at the moment.”

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To counter the problem, Merkel proposes hiring more staff for Germany’s overworked immigration offices.

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A recent government report showed 549,209 refugees were residing in the country even though there asylum claims were denied. As few as 30,000 were actually deported.

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The refugees from Syria are fleeing a country torn apart by war. These are just a few of the many coming to Germany, though, and that puts the German government in tough spot. Which refugees get to stay? Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari was in Berlin Saturday to talk about options that might slow the migrant stream from Africa.

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The official position of the government is to deport most of the African immigrants, and all of them from Nigeria, as Merkel says “most of them came for economic reasons.”

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The wave of immigrants is under scrutiny for the drain they’re putting on Germany’s economic resources. Many of the Muslim immigrants face additional scrutiny because of the fears of crime and the heightened danger posed by terrorists.