101316-a6

Russia has ordered all of its officials and all of their family members to return home. The call comes as tensions between Russia and the rest of the world continue to mount, and the move is seen by many as more than a simple precaution.

The message sent to politicians came directly from Putin’s office, and is backed by patriotic rhetoric. Russia, in the call, is called “the Motherland.” The shift in political relations marks a low point that hasn’t been seen in decades.

101316-a10

[Scroll Down for video]

There are other provocative signs. Putin cancelled a planned visit to France. Nuclear capable bombers have been flying over protected airspace in Europe. Russian involvement in Syria continues unabated.

101316-a9

And now they’ve moved nuclear missiles to the Polish border. The Iskander missiles are now in Kaliningrad, a town on the Baltic Sea, which puts them in range of Berlin and other European cities.

101316-a3

Russian political analyst Stanislav Belkovsky says “This is all part of the package of measures to prepare elites to some ‘big war’.”

101316-a5

Meanwhile, here in the states, The White House has openly accused Russia of coordinating hacks on the email servers of the DNC, and meddling in the election process.

101316-a7

“This is part of the broader escalation in the tensions between Russia and the West, and Russia and NATO,¬†¬†Russian foreign policy analyst Fyodor Lukyanov said in a recent interview. Yet many feel like it is indicative of something larger.

101316-a2

What do the Russians have to say for their actions? Retired Russian Lt. Gen. Evgeny Buzhinsky spoke with the BBC. “Of course there is a reaction,” he said. “As far as Russia sees it, as Putin sees it, it is full-scale confrontation on all fronts. If you want a confrontation, you’ll get one.”

101316-a1

“But it won’t be a confrontation that doesn’t harm the interests of the United States. You want a confrontation, you’ll get one everywhere.'”