The use of on-body-cameras by America’s law enforcement officials has provided some compelling video. Some of the video captured shows just how fast situations escalate, and the dangers cops face. Consider this video from Baltimore.

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Curtis Deal, 18, ran from the Baltimore police. Unfortunately for him, this was just one in a string of bad decisions. He was armed, as the video below clearly shows. And when Deal pointed his gun at Detective David Kincaid Jr., the detective shot him. Deal died in West Baltimore on Tuesday.02102017 g3

This wasn’t Deal’s first scrape with the law. He was out of jail on a $250,000 bond.Police had been tailing a vehicle in which Deal was riding. Deal jumped from the car and ran, and the detectives persued him through the alleys and streets. Detective Kincaid cut him off as he exited an alley, and Deal raised his gun at the Kincaid.

The video released has audio and clear visuals. Deal was warned before he raised his gun at Kincaid. Though Deal was raising his gun at Kincaid, the detective shot first.

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Deal was struck in three places, and died of his wounds.

Police Commissioner Kevin Davis called the shooting justified. The citizens of Baltimore have not risen up in violent protest, either–possibly becasue Deal had reportedly been arrested three times on gun charges in January. Many are questioning why Deal wasn’t already in jail, with so many weapons charges.

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“It shows dysfunction, I believe, in our criminal justice system,” said Mayor Catherine Pugh. “People who have those many gun charges probably should not be on our streets.”

Probably not, no.

Deal, who had a juvinle arrest with a handgun charge, couldn’t legally own a gun. Yet he was arrested on January 4th of 2017, just three months after his birthday, with a handgun. He posted $100,000 bail and was released.

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On January 30th, he was picked up again, and charged with dealing heroin. The week before he was killed, he was arrested again and charged with 9 weapons violations. After posting the $250,000 bond, he was free again.

To help secure his release, Deal’s lawyer told the judge that the boy came from a religious family, and that Deal planned to join the Army to study engineering.

Judge Nicole Taylor let him out.  “I’m giving you an opportunity to go to school and not be in jail pending this trial,” the judge said.

As Deal was walking out of the courtroom, free, the judge had some prophetic words for him. “Best of luck to you, Mr Deal.”