March is basketball season, a.k.a. March Madness, and Obama had created a tradition for this annual event. He took is seriously.  The Trump administration has little interest in carrying on with this tradition. In previous years, Obama, who was an avid fan of basketball, would join with ESPN to select his picks for March Madness on camera.

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Last year Obama called that Hawaii would eliminate California right out of the gate in the opening round. Unfortunately, it seems like President Trump wants nothing to do with this previous tradition.

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John Krulewitz, an ESPN spokesman, explained that the network had attempted to carry on the tradition with Trump. However, even though ESPN expressed “interest to the White House in continuing the presidential bracket. They have respectfully declined.”

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What a bummer! It is funny though that Trump did make Super Bowl predictions (and surprisingly close too). We can only hope that Trump will be as cool as Obama was with sports.

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White House spokeswoman Hope Hicks told The Washington Post in an email, “We look forward to working with ESPN on another opportunity in the near future.”Only there’s no other opportunity. This is March Madness. It only happens once a year.

On the plus side, ESPN executives weren’t entirely shocked by this decision as it is expected with a change in power for annual events to change.

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The reason this annual feature worked so well with Obama was that he was actually interested and involved with the sport. Now, he wasn’t someone that was deeply knowledgeable and knew all the stats, but he knew enough to make the event interesting.

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While we will miss Obama’s March Madness picks, maybe it’s a good thing for Trump to not carry on with the tradition. Wouldn’t want him to ruin the spirit of the feature, would you? And it also gives Trump the ability to feature events that actually interest him as well. It’s a win-win situation in a sense. Trump gets to start fresh with his administration and Obama leaves with two of his brackets from the March Madness feature being featured in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.