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This Train Conductor Had Her Career Derailed By Her Steamy Instagram Pics

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What you post on social media may have lasting implications. The internet rarely forgets anything. One Canadian train conductor was fired becasue pictures she was posting to Instagram were getting a lot of attention. And it is easy to see why. Stephanie Katelnikoff doesn’t fit the mold of the average train conductor.

Canada’s CP Rail didn’t appreciate the extra attention. The CBC reports that Katelnikoff was canned back in November after her employer determined she was “violating CP Rail’s code of ethics and its internet and email policy.”

Photographer Samantha Thompson

A post shared by Stephanie Katelnikoff (@missdemeanour.xo) on

The pictures are one thing, but Katelnikoff has also said negative things about CP Rail. “I think it was a 50/50 split between the two,” She told the CBC.

“When I got dismissed, they blanketed everything together and said I was being dismissed for my inappropriate social media content. So I’m not sure what of my content they’ve deemed appropriate and inappropriate,” she said.

“The investigative officer called my social media content graphic.”

Part of the controversy may be that she posed for photos on the railroad tracks. “It’s dangerous and I don’t recommend anyone does it,” she said. But CP included many photos in their case against her.

“I was surprised that in the investigative material, CP choose to produce the racy photographs,” Drew Jarisz, an Edmonton-based employment lawyer, told the CBC.

😳 📷 Donn Horbach

A post shared by Stephanie Katelnikoff (@missdemeanour.xo) on

“I think it probably hurts their case to substantiate a for-cause allegation, because to me now, in addition to reprimanding her for making derogatory remarks, let’s call them, about the company, it seems as if they are trying to impose their own moral standard and that’s too far for the company to go,” he said.

“I find it very difficult in this case to see how these racy images could impact the ability of CP to carry on business,” said Jarisz.

As for Katelnikoff, she’s hoping arbitration will allow her to return to work. “The work itself is amazing. It’s my favorite job I’ve ever had.”

Katelnikoff isn’t new to train-related controversies, either. On her second trip as a conductor, her train derailed. “I wasn’t thinking,” she told the CBC at the time.

“I was in utter shock. Totally ill-prepared to find something like that. It put me in a bit of a panic because it was only my second trip and I was already just anxious to be on the train by myself, let alone deal with a derailment.”