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Tech Billionaire Pays $10K to Die and Have His Brain Uploaded to a Computer and Live Forever

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As soon as the first person died, those still living have been looking for a way to keep it from happening again. They’ve all failed, over and over. But now a Silicone Valley tech-billionaire is going to pay $10,000 for the possibility that he might achieve a kind of immortality. There’s only one catch; he has to die to do it.

Dying in order to live is a concept familiar to many religious faiths, but the practical application of the philosophy has remained allusive. Yet Sam Altman is willing to try. He’s one of 25 people on a waiting list at Nectome, “a startup company,” the Daily Mail writes, “that says they can upload the contents of a person’s brain and store it on a computer.”

The process, though, will wreck havoc on the rest of his body. As such, the process is classified as a physician-assisted suicide.

In an odd twist, Nectome is a company funded by Y Combinator, a company that Altman founded, that funds ventures like Nectome.

Once his brain is frozen, scientists hope to be able to simulate it on a computer. The science behind this is part of Nectome’s magic, and (they hope) within reach in the near future.

“The company,” the Mail reports, “said the method is ‘100 percent fatal’.”

“The user experience will be identical to physician assisted suicide,” Nectome’s co-founder Robert McIntyre told reporters.

Nectome’s mission is to “preserve your brain well enough to keep all its memories intact: from that great chapter of your favorite book to the feeling of cold winter air, baking an apple pie, or having dinner with your friends and family.”

“We believe that within the current century it will be feasible to digitize this information and use it to recreate your consciousness.”

As of now, Nectome only plans on offering the service to those with a terminal illness. That, they believe, will keep them within the parameters of the law. It is unclear if Altman is hoping to participate in the process sooner or later. The 32-year-old may simply be planning ahead.