When President Trump revoked the transgender bathroom rights in schools, it affected hundreds of transgenders, one of which is Jackie Evancho sister’s, Juliet. Juliet and two other high school seniors sued to challenge the new policy; they just found out the ruling.

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The judge ruled on Monday that the teens can use the bathrooms that corresponds with their identified gender. The case was ruled in favor of Juliet and her two classmates on grounds of equal protection, according to BuzzFeed.

The judge also cited that the personal privacy of individuals in the bathroom was not threatened by the three teens.

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“Other than perhaps one report received by the high school principal in October 2015 from a student that ‘there was a boy’ in the girls bathroom … followed by a parent inquiry along the same lines in early 2016, there have been no reports of ‘incidents’ where the use of a common restroom by any one of the plaintiffs has caused any sort of alarm to any other student,” the judge wrote.

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One of the students, Elissa Ridenour, 18, spoke to the media after the ruling in her favor saying, “Even though it’s such a small win, it really is huge in this respect. I’m very happy and it’s a relief,” she said. “We still have a fight left to go, but we’re not going to give up.”

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This ruling comes after Trump and his administration ended the federal protection for transgender students last week. Jackie, who sang at Trump inauguration earlier this year, stood by her sister and supported the ruling provided by the judge today.

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Now that there is no federal protection, it will be up to individual states to determine whether they allow transgenders to use the bathrooms and lockers room that they identify as.

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The court case came after a student of Evancho’s school complained of being uncomfortable with a student with different genitalia in the same bathroom as her.

The school, in turn, required students to use the bathroom of their biological sex. The school asked for the case to be throw out, a decision the judge chose not to allow.