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School ‘Humiliates’ Braless 17-Year-Old Girl. Tells Her to Put Band-Aids on to Not ‘distract boys in my class.’

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A high-school student has made news this week after she went to school without a bra. The news isn’t that she didn’t wear a bra, but more how the school reacted to it. What began as a simple decision has spiraled into a public relations nightmare for the high-school, who is likely learning a lot from the aftermath of their chosen disciplinary tactics.

“17-year-old Lizzy Martinez,” The Daily Mail writes, “decided not to wear a bra under her gray long-sleeve shirt on Monday, and school officials in Bradenton felt she became a target of other students’ stares. [Braden River High School] is on Florida’s Gulf Coast.”

School dean Violeta Velazquez called Martinez into her office. Martinez thought her talk with the dean would be to address what Martinez felt was bullying by other students. Instead, Velazquez wanted Martinez to address what has been characterized as a “distraction.”

“She told me that I needed to put a shirt on under my long-sleeve shirt to try to tighten my breasts – to constrict them,” Martinez told reporters. “And then she asked me to move around.”

After Martinez moved around, Dean Velazquez felt like she might still be distracting, so she sent the girl to the school nurse. There, Martinez was given band-aids to cover her nipples.

“I decided not to wear a bra today,” Martinez tweeted later, “and got pulled out of class bc one of my teachers complained that it was a ‘distraction to boys in my class.’ My school basically told me that boys’ education is far more important than mine and I should be ashamed of my body.”

Then she tweeted at the school: “Stop sexualizing my body.” The school then blocked her on twitter.

“On Thursday afternoon,” DM notes, “the school district acknowledged that Braden River school officials could have handled the situation better, but the district said it was only trying to enforce the district’s dress code.”

“This matter was brought to the attention of the Superintendent’s Office for review,” Mitchell Teitelbaum, the district’s general counsel, wrote in a statement.

“It is undisputed that this matter should have been handled differently at the school level and corrective measures have been taken to prevent a reoccurrence in the way these matters will be addressed in the future.”

The district’s Code of Student Conduct states: “You are expected to dress appropriately for school and for the business of learning with proper attention given to personal cleanliness, grooming and neatness.” But there’s nothing about bras.