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Apparently, millennial women are unhappy with the way females are portrayed in current online emoji offerings.

According to a survey by Always, women say that most female and female targeted emojis are horribly stereotypical. They also believe women are underrepresented among ‘professional’ emojis. According to Daily Dot:

‚ÄúSociety has a tendency to send subtle messages that can limit girls to stereotypes,” Lucy Walker, documentary filmmaker and creator of the #LikeAGirl video, said in a statement. “As someone who has studied sociolinguistics, I know the kind of impact even seemingly innocuous language choices can have on girls. It was so interesting to hear these girls talk about emojis and realize how the options available to them are subtly reinforcing the societal stereotypes and limitations they face every day.”

The 75 percent of young women who want to see female emoji portrayed more progressively might get their wish soon. The Always study comes just after the Unicode Consortium proposed new ways of modifying emoji, which include the ability to switch genders on emoji like the police officer or athletes.

The Unicode Consortium has proposed that all emojis that portray a person be designed in such a way that they can be male or female.

Do you agree with the findings?