News

The US Navy Confused Russia and Syria So Badly They Had No Idea Where Attack Came From

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr

When President Trump threatened to strike Syria for yet another chemical attack against its own citizens, he was met with threats of retaliation from Syria and their ally Russia. Trump was not deterred and successfully launched a joint attack with fellow allied nations. The strike, which was calculated and precise, was all made possible thanks to a clever decoy.

[Scroll Down For Video]

As talk of an attack began to be publicized, all eyes quickly shifted towards the only U.S. destroyer in the area — the USS Donald Cook. Surely, this ship would lead the charge. However, when the strike took place early Saturday morning, the USS Donald Cook was not involved at all. This was all just part of a larger plan.

The real firepower came from the Red Sea, where the USS Monterey fired 30 Tomahawk cruise missiles and the USS Laboon shot seven missiles, which made up a third of the 105 missiles fired, according to Business Insider.

At the same time, the USS John Warner, a U.S. submarine, and a French vessel fired missiles from the Mediterranean. With strikes come from all different angles, Syria and Russia were unsure where the missiles were actually coming from as the sole ship in the region had not fired a shot.

The U.S. was said to have fired 105 missiles on numerous chemical plants suspected of manufacturing the gas used in the most recent attack.

An air assault consisting of bombers and jets from the U.S., France and the UK also took place the same time. Presumably embarrassed, Syria claimed they shot down 71 of the missiles used in the strikes, but any factual information of this has been non-existent.

“No Syrian weapon had any effect on anything we did,” Lt. Gen. Kenneth McKenzie said following the strike. He went on to boast about the successful operation, which he called “precise, overwhelming, and effective.”

Bloomberg reported that a person familiar with the operation said this attack strategy was planned and by all accounts passed with flying colors.

Syria did fire its anti-missile defense system only after the majority of the missiles had already hit their designated target.