An Oklahoma woman has to relive the pain of being molested when she was 7 years old by her step-uncle after he was recently released from prison and moved in next door to her. Oklahoma law bars child molestors from living near schools and churches, but there is currently no law stopping the predator from living next to the victim.

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Fourteen years ago, Danyelle Dyer, 21, was molested by her step-uncle Harold Dwayne English. This wasn’t English’s first sexual crime towards a child. In the summer of 2003, English came to visit his step-brother after he’d been convicted of molesting a different child.

English didn’t disclose the conviction to his family, so they were unaware. Over the span of the summer, English molestered 7-year-old Dyer multiple times.

Dyer eventually got enough courage to tell her parents, and English was arrested, convicted, and sent away to prison, according to CNN. English was released after an undisclosed amount of time but found himself back in prison after he violated his parole.

Once he was released for the second time, the 64-year-old predator moved in with his mother, who happens to be Dyer’s grandmother. She lives next door.

After doing research, Dyer and her parents were astonished to find that there is no law prohibiting a predator from living next to his victim. But Dyer wasn’t going to let that be the end the issue.

Days after English’s release, Dyer took to Facebook to voice her situation and to bring awareness to an issue that many would never realized was possible.

Her father also went around the surrounding area and informed families of the situation and asked permission to put a big sign alerting people that a child molester lived next door. All of the families living around the Dyers had no objection and embraced her decison to fight back.

The Dyer family is now working on a bill with Oklahoma State Rep. Kyle Hilbert that would make it illegal for a sexual offender to live next door to their victim.

“He’s like right there, practically in my backyard and that kind of makes me nervous and not want to go home ever,” she told KFOR.

According to the Daily News, Hilbert and the Dyers have until February to create a new bill and bring in before the House of Representatives and the Senate for a vote.