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“Fixer Upper” Helps Veteran Get His Dream Home, Then He Gets Tragic News [VIDEO]

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The hit HGTV show “Fixer Upper,” is popular because for all the right reasons. There’s very little titillating gossip or scandal behind the show, and Chip and Joanna Gaines use their talents to help peoples. But one of their latest episodes has some off-screen twists and turns.

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Cleveland Browns quarterback Robert Griffon III and his foundation, Family of 3, were asked to help with a Vietnam veteran in Waco, Texas. Bill Graham needed help, and RGIII enlisted the Fixer Upper crew to assist.

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Graham and his wife Sherry have been married for 45 years. Their home had fallen in to a state of disrepair. When the Fixer Upper crew arrived, they were told that Sherry, who had lung cancer, was in remission.

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“She had lung cancer and they cured the lung cancer and they thought she was cancer-free,” Graham told the local news station. It was the news of Sherry’s remission that made the episode of Fixer Upper so optimistic and hopeful. But Sherry had a relapse.

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“They did the last test and it was in her back and her liver,” Graham noted. “And the doctor was up-front. He gave her six months and she lasted two.”

As she was leaving the hospital after getting her prognosis, Sherry asked her husband to keep her at home. She didn’t want to go back to the hospital again, and she didn’t. She stayed at home until her passing in late October.

“And that’s where she died. Right there. Right next to my bed,” Graham said.

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“If you noticed she wasn’t getting around real well [during the filming of Fixer Upper]. She was actually in St. Catherine’s in rehab but they let her out long enough to do the reveal. When she saw the house for the first time, every room she went in she was saying ‘Oh my gosh!’ She was very appreciative of everything. It meant everything to her.”

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“For the short time mom was here,” their son noted, “you wouldn’t believe the difference it made. She was on a walker, so the hallways and the doors were wider and that made it a lot easier for her.  What it meant to me was finally somebody saw that a deserving person got something that they deserved.”