Zip lines and guns. Part of me wants to ask the age-old question: what could possibly go wrong? Yet I know full well I’d strap in and give it a whirl. The videos below show that it isn’t nearly as risky as the initial shock-value of the concept might suggest, and what better way to prepare for your next James-Bond like zip into hostile territory?

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The videos below are from a series of stages at an improvised 3 Gun competition in Idaho. We’ll start with a run with a 1911 that includes some typical cardboard bad guys, and even a plate-rack.

It is interesting to consider how this changes the range. No need to shoot at the berm, as the ground itself will act as a solid backstop. You would just have to keep the muzzle down far enough that you didn’t send any random fliers out into the wild.

And these guys are even negotiating reloads on the fly. They are harnessed in, so their gear has to be accessible outside of those straps.

This video is a bit more basic, but it shows some of the preparations for the drop and the ride from another angle. It looks like all guns are unloaded at the start of the zip, so there is less chance of involuntary muscle contraction and negligent discharge.

This run below is even longer, and it is made with a rifle. Note that this shooter is ready to run hot while on top of the launch pad.

While many are wondering just how practical it would be to shoot pistols and rifles from a zip line, I think there could be some valuable lessons learned here. If you are going to practice defensive shooting, you need to prepare for anything. You need to experience adrenaline and fear while training. While you may never have to defend your life while on a zip line, this would be a great way to mix things up and see how you cope.

And it could be a practical way to recreate the unusual experience of coming in hot from a parachute jump. This isn’t a skill the Army has had to rely on heavily, at least not since the 1940s, but why not train for it. I can’t imagine any soldier complaining. At the end of this, it looks like a hell of a lot of fun.

And if this isn’t enough for you, you can always practice live-fire repelling with your dog in tow.