Lifestyle

A Look at Some of the Weirdest State Laws That Are Still on the Books

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Nearly every state in the nation has at least a few odd or antiquated laws on the books. While people today may not be charged with some of these associated crimes, it is still interesting to see the wide range of actions that are technically prosecutable offenses. However, other statutes could easily lead to criminal charges even now.

These weird state laws were verified as still being on the books by Business Insider. Here are some of the strangest.

Free Game Limits on Pinball Machines – Arkansas

In an effort to prohibit pinball machines from encouraging gambling, it is illegal for more than 25 free games to be given away to a player who continues to win.

Dwarf-Tossing Can’t Occur at Establishments That Sell Liquor – Florida

Once a somewhat popular bar activity, Florida banned dwarf-tossing at any establishment that sells liquor in 1989. An attempt to repeal the law in 2011 was unsuccessful.

No Eating Frogs That Die During Jumping Contests – California

While the exact reason the law was put into place is unclear, it may have been a method for protecting competitors in frog-jumping contests, such as the famous Calaveras County Fair and Frog Jumping Jubilee.

Liquor Stores are Prohibited from Selling Refrigerated Soda or Water – Indiana

The law states that any liquor, beer or wine store should exclusively be in the adult beverages business, even if the water or soda would be used as a mixer.

Oral Sex is Illegal – Maryland

While the state isn’t known to enforce the law, where violators can be charged with a misdemeanor, oral sex is actually illegal in Maryland.

Not Finishing the National Anthem is a Punishable Offense – Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, only playing or singing part of the National Anthem can result in a fine of no more than $100. It also prohibits remixing the National Anthem as dance music.

Adultery is a Felony – Michigan

In Michigan, adultery is a felony. The statute was added to the books in 1931, and the potential sentence is up to four years and prison and a maximum fine of $5,000.

Men Can’t Falsely Promise Marriage – South Carolina

If, while attempting to seduce a woman, a man uses the promise of marriage, he can be charged with a misdemeanor. The law explicitly only applies to men using the move against women, and not the reverse.

No Hunting with Ferrets – West Virginia

Using a ferret to hunt, catch, injure, pursue, or kill a wild animal, including birds, can result in a fine between $100 and $500 as well as a maximum of 100 days in jail.